Supreme Court Candidates Getting Most of Their Contributions from Gov Candidate Contributors

April 4, 2016

Republicans vs. Democrats

The two candidates for the Wisconsin Supreme Court who face off in Tuesday’s spring election received about 75 percent of their large contributions from contributors who gave to the 2014 Democratic and Republican candidates for governor.

Large individual contributions are contributions of $100 or more in a year.

A Wisconsin Democracy Campaign review found that 78 percent of the 1,960 contributions from large individual contributors to incumbent conservative Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley came from donors who also contributed to Republican Gov. Scott Walker between January 2013 and December 2015.

The contributions to Bradley from Walker backers amounted to $549,560 of the roughly $635,350 in large individual contributions that she accepted between January 2015 and March 21, 2016.

The Democracy Campaign review also found that 73 percent of the 1,718 contributions from large individual contributors to Bradley’s challenger, Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg, came from donors who also contributed to Democratic candidate for governor Mary Burke between January 2013 and December 2014.

The contributions to Kloppenburg from Burke supporters amounted to about $369,290 of the nearly $450,240 in large individual contributions that she accepted between January 2015 and March 21, 2016.

To view some of the largest partisan donors to Bradley and Kloppenburg, go here and here.

When large individual and political action committee (PAC) contributions are totaled by special interest group figures show Kloppenburg received most of her contributions between January 2015 and March 21, 2016 from lawyers – about $124,820 – followed by retirees and homemakers, who gave her $83,079, and labor unions, who gave her $67,085.

Large individual and PAC contributions totaled by special interest group to Bradley between January 2015 and March 21, 2016 showed she received $130,820 from retirees and homemakers, followed by almost $72,450 from manufacturers, and nearly $55,160 from GOP state and local political party committees.