Nominations Are In for New Ethics, Elections Boards

April 25, 2016

Democratic and Republican legislative leaders have given GOP Gov. Scott Walker 12 nominations that he must choose from to fill his four appointments to the new partisan ethics and elections commissions.

The new elections and ethics commissions were created last year by the GOP-controlled legislature and Walker. The panels replace Wisconsin’s nationally recognized Government Accountability Board (GAB) this summer.

The legislative leaders gave Walker a pool of six former clerks and six former judges. The governor must pick two former clerks to serve on the Elections Commission and two former judges to serve on the Ethics Commission. His choices from the Democratic and Republican nominations are subject to Senate approval.

The Republican nominations to the Elections Commission that Walker must pick from are Sue Atherton, former clerk for the villages of Pewaukee and Clinton; Beverly Gill, former Burlington city clerk, and former Brown County Clerk Darlene Marcelle.

The Democratic nominations to the Elections Commission that Walker must pick from are former Lafayette County Clerk Stephen Pickett, former Sheboygan County Clerk Julie Glancey, and Carol Schumacher, former city Eau Claire city clerk.

The Republican nominations to the Ethics Commission that Walker must pick from are Harold Froehlich, a current GAB member and former Outagamie County circuit judge, former Waukesha County Circuit Judge J. Mac Davis, and former Walworth County Circuit Judge Michael Gibbs.

The Democratic nominations to the Ethics Commissions that Walker must pick from are former Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Bonnie Gordon, former Portage County Circuit Judge Frederic Fleishauer, and former Oneida County Circuit Judge Robert Kinney.

Earlier this year, four additional members on each commission were chosen by Democratic and Republican Assembly and Senate legislative leaders. For more about the previous appointees by legislative leaders, see the Democracy Campaign’s earlier posts – here, here, here, here, here, here.

Each appointee to the six-member commissions serves five-year terms.